2016-2017 NYS School Immunization Requirements

Prekindergarten (Day Care, Head Start, Nursery, or Pre-K)

The best way to make sure your child has all the vaccines they need to go to school is to immunize on time. Learn more about childhood vaccines, and be sure your child has their 4-3-1-3-3-1-4 shots by the time they are two years-old:

4
Doses of Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine (DTaP)
3 doses of Polio Vaccine (IPV/OPV)
1 dose of Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR)
1 to 4 doses of Haemophilus influenza type b conjugate vaccine (Hib)
3 doses of Hepatitis B vaccine
1 dose of Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine
1 to 4 doses of Pneumococcal Conjugate vaccine (PCV)

The Importance of Childhood Vaccinations >>
Immunization Schedules for Children >>

Immunization Schedules for Pre-Teens & Teens >>|

Kindergarten, Grades 1 and 2

Backpacks, pencils, new shoes and immunizations! As you go through your back-to-school checklist, be sure to add “Check Immunization records”, and if needed, “Schedule doctor’s appointment for necessary vaccinations” so that your child is up-to-date on the vaccines listed below:

  • Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine (DTaP/DTP/Tdap) – 5 doses or 4 doses if the 4th dose was received at 4 years of age or older or 3 doses if aged 7 years or older and the series was started at 1 year of age or older
  • Polio vaccine (IPV/OPV) – 4 doses or 3 doses if the 3rd dose was received at 4 years of age or older
  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR)- 2 doses
  • Hepatitis B vaccine – 3 doses
  • Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine – 2 doses

Grades 3, 4 and 5

  • Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine (DTaP/DTP/Tdap) – 5 doses or 4 doses if the 4th dose was received at 4 years of age or older or 3 doses if aged 7 years or older and the series was started at 1 year of age or older
  • Polio vaccine (IPV/OPV) – 3 doses
  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR) – 2 doses
  • Hepatitis B vaccine – 3 doses or 2 doses of adult hepatitis B vaccine (Recombivax) for children who received the doses at least 4 months apart between the ages of 11 through 15 years of age
  • Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine – 1 dose

Grades 6, 7 and 8

Pre-teens need additional vaccines besides the ones they received when they were younger:

  • Tetanus and Diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine booster (Tdap) – 1 dose
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) – 1 dose by grade 7

Students in grades 6, 7 and 8 may need additional doses of vaccines they received when they were younger. Ask your healthcare provider if your child has received all of the doses they need for these vaccines.

  • Polio vaccine (IPV/OPV) – 4 doses or 3 doses if the 3rd dose was received at 4 years of age or older
  • Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine – 2 doses

Finally, your pre-teen will need the following vaccines, if he or she doesn’t already have them:

  • Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine (DTaP/DTP/Tdap) – 3 doses, Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR) – 2 doses
  • Hepatitis B vaccine – 3 doses or 2 doses of adult hepatitis B vaccine (Recombivax) for children who received the doses at least 4 months apart between the ages of 11 through 15 years of age

Grades 9, 10, 11 and 12

Whether it’s their first summer job as a camp counselor in training or they’re headed off to college, teens may still need a shot or two to be fully vaccinated.

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) – Grade 12: 2 doses or 1 dose if the dose was received at 16 years of age or older Note: This is a new requirement for students entering grade 12 beginning with the 2016-2017 school year
  • Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine (DTaP/DTP/Tdap) – 3 doses
  • Tetanus and Diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine booster (Tdap) – 1 dose
  • Polio vaccine (IPV/OPV) – 3 doses
  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR) – 2 doses
  • Hepatitis B vaccine – 3 doses or 2 doses of adult hepatitis B vaccine (Recombivax) for children who received the doses at least 4 months apart between the ages of 11 through 15 years of age
  • Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine – 1 dose

And A Few More…

While not required by law, there are other teen vaccines that help protect your child from serious illnesses.

Why are these vaccines important for my child?

Diphtheria and Tetanus toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine (DTaP)
The DTaP vaccine helps children develop immunity to three diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough). Diphtheria is a serious infection that can lead to breathing problems, heart failure, and paralysis. Tetanus is a bacterial infection that causes muscle spasms. Pertussis is a highly infectious respiratory infection that results in violent coughing and difficulty breathing. Childhood vaccinations against these diseases are important, as all three are potentially fatal.

Tetanus and Diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccine and Pertussis vaccine booster (Tdap)
The Tdap vaccine is a booster vaccine used to increase immunity from diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. The Tdap booster is recommended at age 11-12 to address waning immunity to pertussis.

Polio Vaccine (IPV/OPV)
Polio is a viral disease that can invade the nervous system and cause paralysis. While polio has been eliminated in the United States for more than 30 years, other countries still have cases of polio that can be spread through travel. The elimination of polio in the United States is largely due to diligent vaccination. Therefore, vaccinating your child against polio is important to prevent this disease from making a comeback.

Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR)
The MMR vaccine protects against measles, mumps, and rubella. Measles is a viral infection that can cause fever, rash and runny nose and can lead to serious health complications, particularly among young children. Mumps can easily be spread from person to person and typically causes a fever, headache, and swelling of salivary glands, the most well-known symptom of mumps. Rubella can cause a headache, cough, and distinctive red rash, and can occasionally lead to more serious side effects. The MMR vaccine is effective and has been proven to be very safe. In recent years, measles outbreaks have occurred in the U.S., with a majority of those ill being unvaccinated. The MMR vaccine can protect your child from these serious diseases.

Hepatitis B vaccine
Hepatitis B is a viral disease that attacks the liver, which can lead to lifelong infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver failure, liver cancer, and death. The Hepatitis B vaccine provides your child with long-term protection against the disease.

Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine
Chickenpox is a common childhood disease that can sometimes cause serious side effects. The chickenpox virus can easily be spread from person to person, so it’s important that your child is vaccinated before starting school.

Haemophilus influenza type b conjugate vaccine (Hib)
The Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine prevents a serious bacterial disease that can easily be transmitted from person to person. Hib can lead to meningitis and brain damage, pneumonia, infections of the blood, joints, bones, and covering of the heart, and death. Since introduction of the Hib vaccine, invasive Hib cases have decreased 99%. Continuation of Hib vaccination is important to prevent Hib cases from occurring.

Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY)
Meningococcal disease can occur suddenly among healthy individuals and can lead to meningitis and infections of the blood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Meningococcal disease kills 10-15% of infected individuals; of those survivors, about 10-20% will suffer from brain damage, hearing loss, amputations, nervous system problems, and other serious disabilities. The MenACWY vaccine is important for adolescents and young adults as it can help prevent meningococcal disease during a time of increased risk.

Pneumococcal Conjugate vaccine (PCV)
Pneumococcal disease can cause dangerous infections in the blood, lungs, and brain. These infections can lead to brain damage, deafness, and potentially death. By vaccinating your child with PCV, you are helping protect them from pneumococcal disease.
RECOMMENDED

Influenza Vaccine
Seasonal influenza, “the flu,” is caused by a virus. Anyone, at any age, can get the flu. Children who get the flu commonly need medical care, especially before they turn 5 years old. Severe influenza complications are most common in children younger than 2 years old. The virus infects the respiratory tract – nose, throat and lungs. Unlike the common cold, the flu is much more dangerous for children. There are different strains of the flu virus circulating each year, so each flu season is different. The best way to prevent the flu is by your child receiving a flu vaccine each year.

HPV Vaccine
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Around 79 million Americans are infected with HPV, and about 14 million people become newly infected each year. Most infections occur in their late teens and early 20s. Since HPV generally causes no symptoms, most people never even know they have it and can pass the virus to others. More often than not, HPV eventually clears up on its own. But when the disease doesn’t clear on its own, the untreated infection can cause genital warts and certain kinds of cancer. Nearly 26,000 HPV-related cancers are diagnosed each year and, for the most part, could be prevented with the HPV vaccine.

The HPV vaccine is recommended for boys and girls at 11 or 12 years old because it is most effective if given long before first sexual contact and exposure to the virus. Your older teen or young adult can also benefit from the HPV vaccine. Girls through age 26 can get the vaccine and most boys can get the vaccine through age 21. There are around 40 common strains of HPV and the vaccine protects from the most common types of the virus. The HPV vaccine helps to prevent the development of genital warts and cervical and other cancers that can result from an HPV infection.



A Project of County Health Officials of New York